FAQ - High School and Beyond Plan
High School & beyond FAQ

 

High School and Beyond Plan Frequently Asked Questions

Updated: October 2014

  1. What is the High School and Beyond Plan?
  2. Why is the High School and Beyond Plan important?
  3. What are the components of a High School and Beyond Plan?
  4. What is the process for creating, revising, and completing a High School and Beyond Plan?
  5. Will the High School and Beyond Plan change when the graduation requirements change for the Class of 2019?
  6. What is the role of the State Board of Education (SBE) in the High School and Beyond Plan?
  7. How does the High School and Beyond Plan relate to a student's IEP transition plan?

1.  What is the High School and Beyond Plan?

The High School and Beyond Plan is a formal process designed to help students think about their future goals and how to accomplish those goals. This includes exploring interests and career options, developing a course plan for high school, and exploring opportunities to develop skills. Students create their High School and Beyond Plans in cooperation with parents/guardians and school staff. Ideally, students start their plans in eighth grade and then continue to revise them throughout high school to accommodate changing interests or goals.

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2. Why is the High School and Beyond Plan important?
The High School and Beyond Plan provides students with the opportunity to explore their own skills and interests and discover potential career and educational options they may not have been aware of previously. It allows students to take ownership over their high school experience and choose coursework and activities that are relevant to their goals. The HSBP also provides a means of tracking requirements for graduation from high school and entry into postsecondary programs.

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3.  What are the components of a High School and Beyond Plan?
Plans should include at least a career goal, an educational goal, a four-year course plan for high school, and identification of required assessments.

In addition, high-quality High School and Beyond Plans and planning processes include additional elements, found here.

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4.  What is the process for creating, revising, and completing a High School and Beyond Plan?
The process for completing a High School and Beyond Plan is locally determined and may be designed at the school or district level. For example, schools may utilize direct counseling, an advisory model, or create a credited class to guide students in creating and revising their High School and Beyond Plans. Schools and districts may also utilize online tools and curricula, such as these developed by OSPI. Whether a student has met the requirement for the High School and Beyond Plan is determined at the local level (RCW 28A.230.090).

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5. Will the High School and Beyond Plan change when graduation requirements change for the class of 2019?
The High School and Beyond Plan will continue to be a non-credit graduation requirement for students.

The change in graduation requirements set to take effect for the class of 2019 places a greater emphasis on the role of the High School and Beyond Plan in student course selection. The plan will guide a student’s choice for the third credit of math and third credit of science, with parent/guardian approval (RCW 28A.230.090 (d)), and the development of personalized pathways. Personalized pathways are based on the career and educational goals articulated in a student’s High School and Beyond Plan. The personalized pathway requirements are classes selected that will help a student develop skills or meet requirements associated with a student’s postsecondary goals (WAC 180-51-068 (14(c))).

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6. What is the role of the State Board of Education (SBE) in the High School and Beyond Plan?

SBE established the High School and Beyond Plan as a graduation requirement in 2000. The requirement is effective for students in the graduating class of 2008 and beyond, through WAC 180-51-061, WAC 180-51-066, WAC 180-51-067, and WAC 180-51-068. The SBE also provides guidance on the High School and Beyond Plan, found here.

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7. How does a High School and Beyond Plan relate to a student’s IEP transition plan?
By the age of 16, students receiving special education services with an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) must begin to develop a transition plan as part of their IEP. These plans include setting postsecondary goals for employment and education and developing a high school course of study and other activities for skills development to help students reach their goals. These components are also part of high-quality High School and Beyond Plans. IEP teams are encouraged to incorporate other components of their school or district’s High School and Beyond Plan that are appropriate for the student into the transition plan.

Because the decision on whether a student has met the High School and Beyond Plan requirement is made at the local level (RCW 28A.230.090), a district or school may determine that a student’s transition plan is the High School and Beyond Plan.

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